Research and Evaluation


Recent Projects

Summary of Impact Research New Zealand Ltd Projects 2018


Charitable Company Limited Hauora Grants Evaluation

Impact Research NZ (IRNZ) was commissioned by Charitable Trust Company Limited (CCL) to review their existing documentation and conduct an evaluation of the Hauora Grants it provides.

CCL is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Tauhara North No 2 Trust (TN2T) which manages three blocks of land in an area occupied by Ngāti Tahu. TN2T provides a range of grants and programmes to assist eligible whānau across a wide number of activities and needs. To eligible to receive a Hauroa grant, applicants must be linked to TN2T via a beneficial owner (whānau who can trace their whakapapa to those granted ownership of the land or are parties to Whānau Trusts).

Hauora Grants provide financial assistance to eligible whānau to access healthcare under a series of five separate grant categories (General Health, Vision, Dental, Dentures or Orthodontics and Hearing).

  • Data was collected via a document review to provide context and inform the evaluation.
  • Two focus groups, one in Rotorua and one in Taupo attended by 17 whānau members to gain their opinions and experiences of accessing healthcare, and the impact of receiving a Hauora grant for themselves and other whānau members.
  • An online survey was responded to by 76 whānau members who were eligible to receive a Hauora grant. Information was sought to determine their satisfaction with access to a Hauora grant, the demographic details of whānau accessing a Hauora rant, the mAn ain benefit of receiving a Hauora grant and the extent to which a Hauora grant met the costs of healthcare.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis of key findings from participants to the focus groups and whānau responding to the online survey to inform the future direction of Hauora grants to enable CCL to continue to meet the needs of eligible whānau.

Weir, A., & Holmes, J. (2018). Charitable Company Limited Hauora grants Evaluation. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ.


Charitable Company Limited Evaluation of Whānau Grants and Programmes

Impact Research NZ (IRNZ) was commissioned by Charitable Trust Company Limited (CCL) to review their existing documentation and conduct an evaluation of their Whānau grants and programmes.

CCL is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Tauhara North No 2 Trust (TN2T) which manages three blocks of land in an area occupied by Ngāti Tahu. TN2T provides a range of grants and programmes to assist eligible whānau across a wide number of activities and needs. To eligible to receive a Whānau grant or participate in a Whānau programme applicants must be linked to TN2T via a beneficial owner (whānau who can trace their whakapapa to those granted ownership of the land or are parties to Whānau Trusts).

Whānau grants are provided to assist applicants in sports, art and Māori cultural activities that have an educational element. The Tangihanga grant provides applicants with financial assistance to help towards tangihanga related costs. The Whānau Support programme provides support, advice and also advocates for any issues that whānau find challenging in their lives. The Te Hononga Whānau programme provides whānau with the opportunity to receive education, empower and strengthen linkeages to their whakapapa, the whenua and other whānau members through bi-annual events conducted across four locations in New Zealand (Christchurch, Tokoroa, Wellington and Auckland).

Data was collected via:

  • A document review to provide context and inform the evaluation.
  • A telephone survey delivered to 15 selected beneficial owners to explore their knowledge around Whānau grants and programmes, ease of access and main reasons for applying, potential barriers, the impact of Whānau grants and programmes and their suggestions for potential improvements.
  • A paper-based survey delivered to 124 attendees of a CCL hui to gain their knowledge around Whānau grants and programmes, the extent to which Whānau grants and programmes met their needs, potential barriers to participation and their suggestions for potential improvements.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis of key findings from participants to the telephone and paper-based surveys to inform the future direction of Whānau grants and programmes.

Weir, A., & Holmes, J. (2018). Charitable Company Limited Evaluation of Whānau Grants and Programmes. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ.


Support for Young People with High and Complex needs

Impact Research NZ was commissioned by the Ministry of Education (MoE) to provide an evaluation of an education facility to determine the effectiveness of the support it provides to young people and their families/whānau and/or caregivers from the perspectives of:

  • Young people engaged with the service.
  • Families/whānau and/or caregivers engaged with the service.
  • Key contacts from a range of stakeholders (e.g. Government departments, referrers to the service and support agencies.

An evaluation of current data collection and methodology was also undertaken to determine the effectiveness of the service and provide context for the evaluation.

The educational facility is contracted to provide support to young people in school years seven to 13 that have been in the long-term care of Oranga Tamariki and have high and complex needs, behavioural issues and educational needs. Young people are assessed to determine their learning and educational needs within a wider framework that evaluates all areas of young people’s lives. The service is also responsible for coordinating a team of professionals from agencies involved in supporting each young person and ensuring that the principles of the framework and model are adhered to with fidelity. The desired outcomes of the service are to provide support to enable young people to develop skills necessary for them to function in and engage effectively with their community.

Data was collected from the following groups: young people involved with the educational facility, their families/whānau and/or caregivers and representatives from key stakeholders including funding agencies and providers of allied support services.

  • Young people participated in face-to-face interviews to gather information about their expectations of the service. Their experience of the support provided by the educational facility. Perceived changes in their behaviour and attitudes. Aspects of the service that worked well for them and those that had been the most challenging.
  • Families/whānau and/or caregivers participated in face-to-face interviews to gather information about their experience of the service. The extent to which engaging with the service made a difference to themselves and their young person. What aspects of the service worked well and suggestions for potential improvements.
  • Representatives from key stakeholders participated in face-to-face interviews to gather information about their understanding of the framework within which the educational facility operates. Their perspectives of their roles in relation to others. Aspects of the service that they found helpful and those that were found to be challenging. Their opinions of the effectiveness of the service in meeting the needs of young people and suggestions for potential ways in which the service could be improved. Key stakeholders were also asked for their opinions around the potential to replicate the services provided by the educational facility elsewhere in New Zealand.

Results provided the MoE with an evaluation of how well the educational facility was meeting the needs of young people and their families/whānau and/or caregivers and other key stakeholders. An evaluation of data collection methodology to evidence the effectiveness of the service. The quality of the relationships between the service and its key stakeholders. The extent to which the service adhered to the framework of the model of service delivery and practice and the perceived potential to replicate the service in other parts of New Zealand.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis from all stakeholder groups to inform the future direction and processes of the educational facility and further collaboration with other key stakeholder groups to ensure that the needs of young people and their families/whānau and/or caregivers are effectively met.

Weir, A., & Holmes, J. (2018). An External Evaluation of an Educational Facility. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ.


The Far North Safer Community Council – Building Safer Communities AutoMotivate Evaluation Project: “A Passport to Life” 2018

Impact Research NZ Ltd (IRNZ) was commissioned by Far North Safer Community Council to conduct and evaluation of the AutoMotivate programme to gain an understanding of the impact that the AutoMotivate programme had on participating rangatahi and their whānau.

The Far North Safer Community Council established the AutoMotivate programme to provide education and support to rangatahi to create safer drivers and roads and reduce the likelihood of entering the criminal justice system. Utilising a whānau ora approach, the programme provides a wraparound mentoring framework to proactively address issues of rangatahi incurring excessive driving violations, driving with non-compliant vehicles, and breaches of driving licence conditions. The aim of the programme is to support rangatahi to improved access to education, training and employment and to encourage and support rangatahi to become contributing members of society, achieve their aspirations.

Data was collected via:

  • A document review to provide context and inform the evaluation.
  • Focus groups with eight rangatahi who had participated in the AutoMotivate programme to explore reasons for participating in AutoMotivate. What worked well and what did not work well, the impact of the programme on the lives of participants, potential barriers to participation and suggestions for improvements to the programme. A brief paper-based survey was also delivered to focus group members to explore driving violations and high-risk behaviours prior to participating in the AutoMotivate programme and the impact of the AutoMotivate programme on these behaviours.
  • Online and paper-based surveys delivered to 24 rangatahi who had participated in the AutoMotivate programme to gather information about driving violations and high-risk behaviours prior to participating in the AutoMotivate programme, access to the programme, goal setting, aspects of the programme that worked well and not so well and most and least important parts of the programme. Rangatahi were also asked about the impact of the AutoMotivate programme from their perspectives, involvement of other whānau members and suggestions for potential improvements.
  • Focus groups attended by nine whānau of participating rangatahi to gather information about knowledge of the AutoMotivate programme, concerns for rangatahi prior to their participation, expectations of the programme, the impact of the programme for themselves and their rangatahi. Also explored were aspects of the programme that worked well and not so well and suggestions for potential improvements.
  • Online survey delivered to 12 key stakeholders to gather information about their relationship with the Far North Safer Community Council. Their understanding of the AutoMotivate programme and its effectiveness towards its intended aims. The impact of the programme for participating rangatahi and their ongoing relationship with the Police and the potential for the programme to scale up and be replicated in other areas of high need. Questions also asked key stakeholders for their suggestions for potential improvements to the programme.
  • A face-to-face interview was conducted with member of management of AutoMotivate to provide additional context.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis from all stakeholder groups to inform the future strategic direction of the Far North Safer Community Council and the AutoMotivate programme.

Weir, A., Lowe, G., & Holmes, J. (2018). The Far North Safer Community Council – Building Safer Communities AutoMotivate Evaluation Project: “A Passport to Life”, 2018. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ Ltd.


The Helensville Women and Family Centre: External Evaluation of Current Services 2018

Impact Research NZ Ltd (IRNZ) was commissioned by Helensville Women and Family Centre (HWFC) to conduct an evaluation of their current services delivers to the community.

HWFC serves women and their families/whānau in the area of South Kaipara. The organisation utilises employed and contract staff and volunteers to provide services, which include a navigator service to provide advice and information about their services, counselling and also advocates on behalf of their clients to access additional support services. There are a number of family-based programmes and those targeted towards parenting and young children. Strengthening Families is a free family support service available to women, youth and families/whānau and a range of programmes, including abuse prevention, provide a safe environment for those attending. A youth group has also been established in collaboration with Kaipara college.

Data was collected via:

  • A document review to provide context and inform the evaluation.
  • A focus group attended by nine clients of the HWFC to gather information about their knowledge of HWFC services, the impact of the support provided to them by the HWFC and quality of interactions. Aspects of the services that worked well, suggestions for additional services and potential improvements to current services.
  • An online survey delivered to 53 representatives of key stakeholders gathered information about their organisation’s relationship with the HWFC, the extent to which they would recommend the HWFC to others and ease of access for clients. Further questions asked representatives for their opinions of the effectiveness of HWFC services for clients, contribution of such services to the work of their organisation, suggestions for additional services and potential service improvements.
  • A focus group attended by six HWFC staff and volunteers to gather information about training, communication between staff and the organisation and perceptions of important aspects of their roles and challenges. Staff and volunteers were also asked to comment on the services provided by the HWFC to clients and ways in which the HWFC can evidence its effectiveness for clients to key stakeholders and the wider community. Other questions asked for staff and volunteers suggestions for additional services and potential service improvements.
  • An online survey was delivered to four members of the HWFC Board of Trustees. Questions asked about their perceptions of the relevance of services offered by the HWFC to women and their families/whānau in the community. Aspects of the service that worked well, the effectiveness of collaboration between the HWFC and key stakeholders, evidence-based data to demonstrate service impact, potential additional services and future focus of services.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis from all stakeholder groups to inform the future strategic direction of the HWFC and the services it provides to clients.

Weir, A., & Holmes, J. (2018). The Helensville Women and Family Centre: External Evaluation of Current Services 2018. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ Ltd.


Family Violence Community Research Project 2018.

Impact Research NZ Ltd (IRNZ) was commissioned by an independent organisation that provides support to victims of family violence to conduct a high-level literature review on best practice in delivering family violence prevention and support programmes. To explore the current attitudes and beliefs of community members around issues of family violence, accessing support, and to inform the organisations’ future work in the community around education and family violence prevention.

The family violence support organisation provides residential refuge and community-based education and support to women and their children/whānau who have or who are currently experiencing issues of family violence. Through the programmes and education the organisation provides women are educated about their legal rights, ways to establish safety plans for themselves and their children/whānau and create plans to optimise their future wellbeing.

Data was collected via:

  • A brief high-level literature review to provide context and inform best practice for delivering family violence prevention and support programmes.
  • A focus group attended by six community-based members to gather their views on the incidence of family violence in New Zealand, the main causes and types of people affected by family violence and actions to help family or friends seeking help for issues of family violence. Opinions were also sought around potential barriers to help seeking, source of information and knowledge of services for perpetrators or victims of family violence and the most effective means of support from their perspective.
  • A focus group attended by seven professionals or representatives of organisations that was involved, or collaborated with family violence support services to gather their views on their views on the incidence of family violence in New Zealand, the main causes and types of people affected by family violence. Questions also sought their opinions of significant barriers to help seeking and potential solutions, knowledge of available local services, the extent to which their organisation was involved in supporting people using or receiving family violence and ways in which their organisation could contribute to reducing the incidence of family violence, A final question asked focus group participants of their views on the challenges that may be experienced by their organisation delivering support to people experiencing family violence.
  • An online survey delivered to seven professional and community-based members to gather their views of the extent to which they felt that family harm was a significant problem locally and nationally. The causes of and types of people affected by family violence. Knowledge of available support services and potential barriers to seeking help.

An overall report provided a high-level synthesis of the current bank of literature and the views of all stakeholders around the areas under investigation. This information will be used by the organisation to help better understand current attitudes and beliefs about family violence, knowledge and preferences of access to supports and to inform their future work around providing advocacy for and education around family violence and prevention.

Weir, A., Cockle, V., Lowe, G., & Holmes, J. (2018). Family Violence Community Research Project 2018. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ Ltd.

Charitable Company Limited Rangatahi Programmes Evaluation of Kia Mau Camp

Impact Research NZ (IRNZ) was commissioned by Charitable Trust Company Limited (CCL) to review their existing documentation and conduct an evaluation of the Rangatahi programmes that it provides. With a focus on youth development and connecting rangatahi to their whᾱnau, whakapapa and whenua, one of the goals of CCL is to ensure that high numbers of rangatahi access education, develop the skills to make positive decisions about their future.

As part of a wider review, an evaluation of CCL’s Kia Mau camp was conducted. The Kia Mau camp is designed for rangatahi aged between 10 and 12 years old, is held annually during the school holidays in October. The camp aims to improve self-esteem, build confidence, support goal setting, enhance communication skills and foster the development of positive relationships. Rangatahi experience a range of activities (e.g. hiking, mystery road trips, planting trees) that are designed to enhance their ability to work in a team and communication skills.

Data was collected via:

  • A pre-camp paper-based survey delivered to rangatahi at the beginning of camp. Questions explored rangatahi’s knowledge of the Kia Mau camp and their expectations prior to attending. Using a five-point Likert scale how rangatahi felt about themselves (e.g. ‘I am happy”, “I feel confident” and how they rated their interactions with others (e.g. “ I am good at listening to others”.
  • A post-camp paper-based survey was delivered to rangatahi at the completion of camp. Questions explored rangatahi’s rating and favourite aspects of the camp and suggestions for potential improvements. For comparison purposes identical questions asked rangatahi how they felt about themselves and their interactions with others.
  • Whᾱnau/parents/caregivers of the attending rangatahi were asked about their knowledge of the Kia Mau camp and their satisfaction with the enrolment process. Further questions explored their previous experience of the Kia Mau camp and the impact of attendance for their rangatahi and suggestions for potential improvements.
  • An interim report of the findings provided a high-level synthesis of the views of rangatahi and their Whᾱnau/parents/caregivers. The results will be incorporated with evaluations of other rangatahi programmes into an overall report which will help to inform the future strategic direction of CCL’s Rangatahi programme.

Weir, A., Lowe, G., & Holmes, J. (2018). Charitable Company Limited Kia Mau Camp Evaluation. Auckland, New Zealand: Impact Research NZ Ltd.




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